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to hire the energy commission. california became the leader in energy efficiency. we put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all
are being met. >>> also this half hour, if you're kicking it with the energy drink, there's a new warning about some new drinks and what's in the can. we'll tell you all about that. tens of thousands of people are ending up in the hospital. emergency rooms are filling up after people drink this drink. what doctors say it's doing to your body. >> i think the mantra is everything in moderation, right? >> absolutely. >> you shouldn't consume four in a short period of time. >> yeah. too much coffee makes you crazy. >> strong coffee makes me jittery, among other things. >>> she's in her 40s but looks way younger. kelly ripa revealing a key beauty secret. why she says it makes her makeup artist's life a lot easier. i think it makes her perkier, too. does she ever have a bad day? >> she's unbelievable. she's super woman. >>> first, new details on that hostage drama unfolding in the sahara desert. at least three americans are among those being held. >> abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz is traveling with the defense sec care, who is in italy, watching every move. >> reporter:
. it is within our reach to lead in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kan., must show the path, the difficult path for america to go in these troubled times. .. the and >> we and shannon >> thank you. >> that was governors sam brownback with the state of the state address. we now go to senator anthony headley for the democratic response to enact we have been talking that the string that we have time. we have talked about how i have a dream. we will somehow realizes principles and the declaration of independence. i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words", clairborne carson recalls his march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend on monday featuring authors and books from the inauguration. president obama, and martin luther king jr. >> every weekend latest nonfiction authors and books are featured on booktv. you can see past programs and schedules our website and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> congress talked about avoiding
we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote th
system and allow us to speak to the needs of manufacturing, because many are energy-intensive operations and need to be energy efficient so utilizing energy and build into the equation and also innovation, so doing things in a smarter fashion, and able to compete at the international level for jobs, because as we land those contracts with improved operations, that means more american jobs. and that approach, that cutting-edge thinking that enables us to maintain that sense of productivity and our intellectual capacity as a nation and takes the research that we should invest into and allows us to translate that research into jobs. so there are these dynamics of change and reform that can be brought into the discussions here as we go forward, and that will speak, i think, to the vitality, the economic vitality of this nation and the growth of jobs that i think are significant, that are long-lasting and bring us into a sophisticated thinking, which this american society is very capable of doing. mr. garamendi: last year, you and i talked in the last congress, which was last year, you and i
that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7
that people wante. i introduced the mid-atlantic jobs act 2012. it opens up coastal virginia energy for energy exploration and harvesting. it would create 18,000 jobs. we're blessed with an abundance of natural resources in our country. we create tremendous employment and opportunity for inner-city kids that are hurting so badly. i and intent on the full fabric of our community crossing the finish line. that means great schools and good roads. there is one thing standing in the way of us moving forward with coastal virginia energy and that is the obama administration with secretary salazar. we need to diversify our local economy in virginia. i hope we can work with both of our senators to get this done. host: we are talking with representative scott rigell. this is a headline in "the washington post." she talks about a new freshman class of republicans and your class as well that had been a headache for the speaker. there will be a test on tuesday. where do you come down on this? guest: i think we have been good for the speaker. i am not dodging the questione. everybody needs to shoot straight
work. we've got to reach for energy independence. we've got to reform our immigration system. we've got to give our children the best education possible, and we've got to do everything we can to protect them from the horrors of gun violence. and let me say i'm grateful to vice president biden for his work on this issue of gun violence and for his proposals, which i'm going to be reviewing today and i will address in the next few days and i intend to vigorously pursue. so, with that, i'm going to take some questions. with'm going to start julie pace of ap. and i want to congratulate julie for this new, important job. >> thank you very much. >> yes. >> i wanted to ask about gun violence. today marks the one-year -- or one-month anniversary of the shooting in newtown, which seemed to generate some momentum for reinstating the assault weapons ban. but there's been fresh opposition to that ban from the nra. and even harry reid has said that he questions whether it could pass congress. given that, how hard will you push for an assault weapons ban? and if one cannot pass congress, what other m
companies, and it is producing more than ever in energy from other sources, both domestically and from other places, and i think that's great. i think that we import around a million dollars a day from venezuela. this is me speaking. i'm not being paid by anybody but i sure would love to see a million barrels of oil coming down the pipeline from alberta to houston. within that the need? is that a coincidence? i think that would be terrific. so, i remember threats by the governor of venezuela not a single drop of oil will go to the united states. great. i think what we need to do is remove that leverage over our economy and we have done it and we should continue to do so. >> it's my understanding, this is a question of fact that it's my understanding the only country that is playing is really the united states and basically they are getting a discounted rate so on terms of the more favorable to respect people on the audience know more about this. >> i don't know who is paying what for what. >> venezuela is subsidizing cuba and the cuban economy at the rate of $4 billion a year out of 60 billi
% is used to help with schools and poor people and the last 20% is used to develop renewable energy sources. host: thanks for the call from new jersey. we reflect on the words of dwight eisenhower in his fair well address. the question we are asking the role in government in solving america's problems. his farewell address on january 17, 1961 included advice to the country saying the government cannot solve all of the nation's problems. he also talked about america's military industrial complex. here is more from his farewell address. >> in the councils of government we must guard against unwanted influence whether sought or unsought we the military industrial complex. the potential for the decastrouse rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. we must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. we should take nothing for granted. only knowledgeable sidry can compel the huge machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals. so let's secure liberty may prosper together. host: the comments of eisenhower in his farewell address. the wa
such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experience similar events. >> okay. and going in -- to the effect on auto industry, are there things that have changed in terms of resilience with the auto industry, in terms of the supply chain or things that changed since fiewk fukushima? >> yes, i think there's a tremendous change take place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers. anything beyond the tier two down to event tier five, we didn't have not have any -- [inaudible] and we assume that supply chain shape like pyramids and suppliers take care of several tier two, three, and four. what we found in the case especially the semiconductor companies. it's almost like a spindle shape, and we are very surprised, and therefore, we have to make a -- supply chain even down to a tier five. so this work has immediately start. and what we have found is that there are about 2,000 critical parts where there's on one single suppliers or one special use. and therefore, there's no -- lik
covered because that's our mission for health. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> okay. you now what if i'm not allowed to be snide, you are not allowed to be condescending. >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." thirty-four minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. linda in atlanta. hi linda. >> caller: hi. >> stephanie: hello, hi. >> caller: i -- i hope aisha doesn't have to go to court any time soon, because she's going to have to have a huge fund to pay for all of these stenographers that pass out trying to keep up with her. >> stephanie: you didn't keep up with her. >> caller: and here is the thing, there was a special on the white house christmas hdtv thing with michelle obama and she had these beautiful pink earrings, and they were very distinctive, and then i saw a clip a few days ago, with aisha walking through some entertainment show thingy spot and she had the same ea
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12